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Posts Tagged ‘research’

skeletonThe Anatomage Table is the most technologically advanced anatomy visualization system for anatomy education and is being adopted by many of the world’s leading medical schools and institutions. Jack Choi lectures on the development of the table and some of the remarkable features it displays. St Mary’s Hospital in London has become the first hospital in Europe to purchase a digital anatomy table. It is changing the way surgeons teach anatomy, and even how they plan real operations.

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indexThis week’s Times Higher Education takes a sideways glance at PhD supervision. How did the experiences of five postgraduates shape the way they later supervised the next generation? Included is a ready reckoner – How to help, or hinder – from an experienced supervisor highlighting the do’s and don’ts of mentoring.

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bikram-poseWhile all are agreed that physical activity and exercise are beneficial for health there is less consensus surrounding the length and duration this activity should take. The science journalist Catherine de Lange casts a critical eye over the pros and cons of some recent developments in this field. Whether it is the relatively leisurely jog or the more intense Tabata workouts, the mysteries of spinning classes or the enigma of Bikram Yoga, de Lange consults the various sports scientists to help throw some light on the heat generated.

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journal rateJournal Rate is a searchable database of thousands of academic journals helping researchers in all fields find the appropriate journal to submit their research to. Academics can search by keyword or scope and refine their search by impact factor to help direct them to the leading journals in their respective fields. Additionally, researchers are encouraged to rate and review their experiences with each journal they have submitted to. By leaving feedback on aspects such as ease of submission process, the cost to publish, and the quality of peer reviews, other academics will be better equipped to make informed decisions regarding where they choose to publish.

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GlasgowGlasgow City of Science is a partnership of over 50 organisations including Glasgow City Council, Glasgow Life, universities, Glasgow School of Art, colleges, research pools and local industry. Their mission, “To inspire the curious, stimulate the creative, empower the wise and connect those with passion”, determines that their site has something for everyone with an interest in any aspect of science. Whether you want to keep up to date with current developments, or sign up for one of their Science Walks, the site has something for you.

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mouthIt would appear that there is more than meets the eye in a winning smile. Dentists have found “striking” levels of bad teeth in athletes competing at the London 2012 Olympic Games. A fifth of athletes surveyed said their oral health actually damaged their training and performance. One in three said their oral health affected their quality of life and one in five said it affected training or athletic performance.
The report concluded that the oral health of athletes attending the dental clinic of the London 2012 Games was poor with a resulting substantial negative impact on well-being, training and performance. As oral health is an important element of overall health and well-being, health promotion and disease prevention interventions are urgently required to optimise athletic performance.

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Research as art?

Some stunning entries from the 2013 Research as Art competition organised by the Swansea University Research Forum. Entrants are invited to submit a visual representation of their research…with some very interesting results. This Guardian article presents some of this year’s best entries.

Ben Woods 2012 competition entry

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120px-Ifosfamide-3D-spacefillIn the decade since the sequencing of the human genome, there has been a steadily increasing flow of knowledge about the detailed molecular landscape of cancer, and this is now moving from research into clinical practice. The falling price of molecular analysis, in particular sequencing of DNA, is allowing us to routinely interrogate cancer tissues at a level of detail that was hard to imagine at the beginning of this century, and this in turn is posing challenges for the way we conduct clinical trials. It seems likely that our old models, which served well at a time when cancers were classified by their tissue of origin, will progressively give way to both a new taxonomy and new ways of determining the value of therapies for the entities that we define.

Peter Johnson, Chief Clinician at Cancer Research UK, provides insight into molecular stratification and the changing face of cancer trials…

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A recent article on the Big Think blog highlights the growing trend for using smart phones to aide scientific data collection. Research on flu trends, and previously unknown side effects of particular medications has recently been carried out using Google and internet search data. The article discusses a new project by the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at UCL which aims to “shed new light on our understanding of memory, impulsivity, how we take risks, and how well the mind’s eye can see”. It aims to attract participants by adding a “game” element to the data collection. An app has been developed which consists of 4 games – “one on memory, one to test impulsiveness, one to look at happiness and one to examine the phenomenon of “brain blink” – the difficulty we have seeing an image that is flashed in quick succession after another image”. The Great Brain Experiment app is free to download for iPhone and Android.

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leather_footballCan the pressure of perfectionism put on young elite footballers lead to a form of burnout?
What is burnout? Are there psychological aspects to it, or does the multidimensional side of things make it very difficult to tie down?
For anyone involved in youth soccer there are aspects of this interview with Dr Andrew Hill, Lecturer in Sports and Exercise Science at the University of Leeds, which make for uncomfortable reading.

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