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Posts Tagged ‘journals’

journal rateJournal Rate is a searchable database of thousands of academic journals helping researchers in all fields find the appropriate journal to submit their research to. Academics can search by keyword or scope and refine their search by impact factor to help direct them to the leading journals in their respective fields. Additionally, researchers are encouraged to rate and review their experiences with each journal they have submitted to. By leaving feedback on aspects such as ease of submission process, the cost to publish, and the quality of peer reviews, other academics will be better equipped to make informed decisions regarding where they choose to publish.

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An outbreak of the hospital superbug MRSA has been brought to an end by UK doctors cracking the bacterium’s genetic code. The original research article appeared in the Lancet Infectious Diseases, which is available full-text from Science Direct. Access Science Direct via the A-Z of databases, or use the SFX system to locate the journal.

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The issue of Open Access to research is a controversial and, in these tough financial times, an immediate one. The UK recently unveiled its proposal to make all publicly funded research open access. And, PHD Comics have put their own spin on the matter.

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A study published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine has found that prospective doctors studying at UK medical schools, are not receiving adequate instruction on the promotion of physical activity.
James Morgan interviews one of the authors of the study for Science Omega. To see the full-text of the study simply go to the library’s SFX system and put British Journal of Sports Medicine in to the search box. Choose the database that covers the most recent edition of the journal.

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A report by Dame Janet Finch argues that there is a powerful “moral” case for publicly funded research to be freely available. BBC reporter Pallab Ghosh provides a good summary of where we are at the moment, and the cases for and against the expansion of free full-text access to publicly funded research.

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A study by researchers from Newcastle University and the University of Strathclyde indicates that more needs to be done to encourage young children to be active. The research paper, published in the open access journal PLoS ONE this week, highlights a number of factors which influence the amount and intensity of physical activity children partake in, from the age of their father to participation in after-school clubs.
There is an interview with Dr Mark Pearce, who led the study, in the latest edition of Science Omega. Dr Pearce discusses what the findings of the research suggest about why children are so inactive, and how this may be remedied for the good of their health.
Open Access journals are available through the library’s SFX system.
To view the research report above simply put PLoS One into the SFX Search Box and click on Go. This takes you through to the Home Page of PLoS (Public Library of Science), and simply scroll down to the required article.

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The on-line journal, Science Omega, has an interview with Professor Ellis Cashmore about his recent research into the attitude of fans towards homosexual footballers.
The study, which has been published in The British Journal of Sociology (BJS), used an anonymous online survey to gauge the views of 3,500 football supporters, and represents the first empirical investigation of homophobia across fan culture.
The article (Fans, homophobia and masculinities in
association football: evidence of a more
inclusive environment) is available free online through the library’s SFX system. To access the article from off-campus you will need your Athens Account.

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