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Posts Tagged ‘coaching’

CommonwelathgamesCommonwealth Games organisers have produced a Glasgow 2014 Factsheet that outlines the history of the event, information on the participating countries and the venues for each event. There is also a Game On Scotland site that “aims to provide inspiration and learning and teaching opportunities related to Glasgow 2014 and other momentous events happening throughout Scotland in the coming years”.

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leather_footballCan the pressure of perfectionism put on young elite footballers lead to a form of burnout?
What is burnout? Are there psychological aspects to it, or does the multidimensional side of things make it very difficult to tie down?
For anyone involved in youth soccer there are aspects of this interview with Dr Andrew Hill, Lecturer in Sports and Exercise Science at the University of Leeds, which make for uncomfortable reading.

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leather_footballThe November issue of Journal of Sports Sciences is a special issue devoted to the topic of identifying and developing elite soccer players. The emphasis is very much on the science underpinning talent identification and development in soccer. Several sports science discipline areas are represented with specific papers focusing on anthropology, pedagogy, physiology, psychology, sociology and coaching science. There is an in-depth look at the multidimensional nature of talent development.
This journal can be accessed in the following ways:
Hamilton Campus Library holds hard copies of Journal of Sports Sciences from 2004 to the present.
SPORTDiscus has full-text on-line coverage from 1996 – 2011.
Taylor and Francis has full-text on-line coverage from 1996 to the present.

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There is an excellent article in a recent copy of the BMJ investigating the link between the sports drinks industry and academia. The article succinctly outlines the meeting of science and creative marketing in what was to become the science of hydration.

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As many of us try to get fitter in this Olympic summer, Panorama investigates the sports products that promise to boost your performance. Are those pricey trainers worth the money? Can sports drinks really help you work out for longer? Are protein shakes any more effective at honing the physique than ordinary food?

With exclusive access to the findings from a unique study by the British Medical Journal and Oxford University, reporter Shelley Jofre tests the science behind the bold advertising claims made by some of sport’s biggest brands.

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Research Councils UK has helped compile a report, “Supporting a UK success story: The impact of university research and sport development“, which aims to highlight just some of the many ways in which research has helped Team GB limber up and prepare for London 2012. The report shows how research taking place at universities across the UK is helping to give athletes that extra split second or millimetre advantage which can mean the difference between gold and silver medals in competitive sports.

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Science Omega Newsletter has an interview with Professor Jirí Dvorák, FIFA Chief Medical Officer, about how he and his colleagues are working to improve the health of players and of the general public. The interview touches on the work of the FIFA Medical and Research Centre (F-MARC) and ‘The FIFA 11+’ programme.

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Dr Michael Ashenden, one of the world’s foremost experts on blood doping and the Athlete’s Biological Passport, is resigning from an expert body on biological passports in sport because he is being “muzzled”. He claims the imposition of a new confidentiality clause in his contract was an attempt to silence him. The newly created Athlete Passport Management Unit, based at the Swiss Laboratory for Doping Analyses in Lausanne comes in for particular criticism for writing in legally binding contracts to stop their experts from speaking out. Dr Ashenden’s outburst could prove embarrassing on the eve of the Olympics as information from the athlete’s biological passport will also play a significant role in anti-doping at the London Olympics, with the profiles of athletes, swimmers and cyclists and rowers being monitored.

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‘What d’you know, you’re a girl!’: Gendered Experiences of Sport Coach Education

Tuesday 29th November 2011
4.00-5.30pm
Room GT 26/27, Ayr Campus

Laura Graham will be leading a seminar on Gendered Experiences of Sport Coach Education, which will be held at the UWS Ayr Campus.

Abstract

Although female participation in sport has been increasing steadily over the last forty years, this growth has not been mirrored in the proportion of women in decision-making and coaching roles. Previous research has suggested that this under-representation is due in part to marginalisation through the current coaching philosophy and infrastructure in the U.K.  This study used Bourdieu’s concepts of symbolic violence and habitus to examine the thoughts and perceptions of male and female sport coaching students regarding the use of football as a context for assessment in a module.  The primary aims were to explore potential issues female students may face in accessing predominantly masculine forms of knowledge and experience, and to develop recommendations for inclusive practice in coach education.

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Professor David Cowan, speaking at the British Science Festival in Bradford, has spoken of a new test to detect autologous blood doping among sport cheats. This is the practice of transfusing the athlete’s own blood back in to their body before an event in order to enhance their performance. To date, autologous blood doping has been undetectable. WADA (World Anti-Doping Agency) have succeeded in developing a test based on differences in blood cell surface antigens, which led to a successful case against a cyclist at the Athens Olympics, but this has limited applicability. Prof Cowan’s work would widen detectability and greatly reduce the number of offenders.

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