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Posts Tagged ‘climate change’

TED (Technology Entertainment and Design) is a series of non-profit conferences that are devoted to “ideas worth spreading”. Delivered by many celebrated speakers, the talks are divided into 6 major headings – including Science, Technology and Global Issues – and are now available free on-line. Under Science you will find talks that include, “Discovering ancient climates in oceans and ice” and “A tool that finds 3x more breast tumours and why it’s not available to you“.

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Photograph of electricity pylons against skylineUWS staff and students now have access to Greenfile, which indexes environment-related articles on topics such as global warming, green building design and recycling.

Greenfile can be accessed from the A-Z list of databases and the sciences resources page.  Although Greenfile does not include full text articles, it is possible to check using SFX whether access is available via another database.

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The US Department of the Environment produces DOE Green Energy, a database of information sources about renewable energy and conservation of energy.  It indexes information about various forms of green energy, including hydroelectric power, wind power, and biofuels.

Green Energy is a US government project.  All the information in this database is from US government sources, e.g., technical reports and patents, but it can be a useful resource if you are looking for international information on environmentally friendly sources of energy.

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The UK’s national academy of science, the Royal Society, has launched a new guide to the science of climate change. The guide has been updated partly as a result of complaints by 43 of the Royal Society’s members who were concerned about the tone of its previous guide. For many members of the Society the previous guide was seen as being too strident and did not fully acknowledge areas of uncertainty. The guide has gone some way to allaying the concerns of the The Global Warming Policy Foundation which is sceptical of the view that human activities are contributing to climate change

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A roundup of recent science and higher education news …

Suggestions for saving money in HE

From Times Higher Education: “Running university terms in shifts and replacing the research excellence framework with a Facebook poll are some of the ideas submitted as part of the government’s online appeal for cost-saving ideas …”

BBC article about the complicated issues around calculating the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions.  A spokesman for the Department of Energy and Climate Change said: “At face value UK emissions look like they have decreased 15% or 16% since 1990. But if you take in carbon embedded in our imports, our emissions have gone up about 12%. We’ve got to be more open about this.”

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This is the review that was set up in December 2009 by the University of East Anglia into the now notorious climate data incident. For many, what was at stake was the objectivity of scientists’ data collection methods and the possible damage to the public’s perceptions of scientific integrity. It also raises the thorny issue of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 in relation to scientific research.

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The Earth Observatory website covers climate and environment discoveries made by researchers at NASA.  In addition to news stories, it is also a useful source of stunning environmental photographs, many of which can be reproduced without breaching copyright. 

NASA image of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

NASA image of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

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