Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘psychology’ Category

leather_footballThe November issue of Journal of Sports Sciences is a special issue devoted to the topic of identifying and developing elite soccer players. The emphasis is very much on the science underpinning talent identification and development in soccer. Several sports science discipline areas are represented with specific papers focusing on anthropology, pedagogy, physiology, psychology, sociology and coaching science. There is an in-depth look at the multidimensional nature of talent development.
This journal can be accessed in the following ways:
Hamilton Campus Library holds hard copies of Journal of Sports Sciences from 2004 to the present.
SPORTDiscus has full-text on-line coverage from 1996 – 2011.
Taylor and Francis has full-text on-line coverage from 1996 to the present.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

A report by Dame Janet Finch argues that there is a powerful “moral” case for publicly funded research to be freely available. BBC reporter Pallab Ghosh provides a good summary of where we are at the moment, and the cases for and against the expansion of free full-text access to publicly funded research.

Read Full Post »

A study by researchers from Newcastle University and the University of Strathclyde indicates that more needs to be done to encourage young children to be active. The research paper, published in the open access journal PLoS ONE this week, highlights a number of factors which influence the amount and intensity of physical activity children partake in, from the age of their father to participation in after-school clubs.
There is an interview with Dr Mark Pearce, who led the study, in the latest edition of Science Omega. Dr Pearce discusses what the findings of the research suggest about why children are so inactive, and how this may be remedied for the good of their health.
Open Access journals are available through the library’s SFX system.
To view the research report above simply put PLoS One into the SFX Search Box and click on Go. This takes you through to the Home Page of PLoS (Public Library of Science), and simply scroll down to the required article.

Read Full Post »

Research Councils UK has helped compile a report, “Supporting a UK success story: The impact of university research and sport development“, which aims to highlight just some of the many ways in which research has helped Team GB limber up and prepare for London 2012. The report shows how research taking place at universities across the UK is helping to give athletes that extra split second or millimetre advantage which can mean the difference between gold and silver medals in competitive sports.

Read Full Post »

As London gets ready to host the 2012 games, the British Psychological Society’s Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology (DSEP) has created the Going for Gold portal to show the part psychology plays in making the Olympics and Paralympics the greatest psychological shows on earth.

Read Full Post »

Interesting article from the BPS Research Digest Blog…

“Over recent years a body of research has accumulated showing the psychological benefits of nostalgia. For example, reminiscing about the past can combat loneliness and off-set the discomfort of thinking about death. Now a team led by Xinyue Zhou has shown that nostalgia brings physical comforts too, making us feel warmer and increasing our tolerance to cold.

The researchers began their investigation by having 19 people keep a diary of their nostalgia activities for 30 consecutive days. It turned out that the participants indulged in more nostalgic reverie on colder days.”

Read Full Post »

The National Autistic Society publish a large amount of information about autism online.  This includes:

  • Autism data – a research tool for anyone researching autism and Asperger syndrome.  Contains information about more than 24,000 relevant papers, books, videos, etc.
  • Research in Progress – a database of current research projects in the field of autism
  • Autism Services Directory – services and support for people with an autism spectrum disorder, their families, and people who work with them.
  • Infosheets – A-Z list of topics covered on the National Autistic Society’s website.  This includes information translated into languages other than English.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: