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Archive for the ‘pharmacology’ Category

GlasgowGlasgow City of Science is a partnership of over 50 organisations including Glasgow City Council, Glasgow Life, universities, Glasgow School of Art, colleges, research pools and local industry. Their mission, “To inspire the curious, stimulate the creative, empower the wise and connect those with passion”, determines that their site has something for everyone with an interest in any aspect of science. Whether you want to keep up to date with current developments, or sign up for one of their Science Walks, the site has something for you.

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At Molecules in Motion research scientists, teachers, and students alike can explore and gain a rapid and deep understanding of molecular structure and function from interactive, rotatable 3D molecular structures.

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A study published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine has found that prospective doctors studying at UK medical schools, are not receiving adequate instruction on the promotion of physical activity.
James Morgan interviews one of the authors of the study for Science Omega. To see the full-text of the study simply go to the library’s SFX system and put British Journal of Sports Medicine in to the search box. Choose the database that covers the most recent edition of the journal.

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A report by Dame Janet Finch argues that there is a powerful “moral” case for publicly funded research to be freely available. BBC reporter Pallab Ghosh provides a good summary of where we are at the moment, and the cases for and against the expansion of free full-text access to publicly funded research.

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Learn.Genetics delivers educational materials on genetics, bioscience and health topics. They are designed to be used by students, teachers and members of the public. The materials meet selected US education standards for science and health. Learn.Genetics website is one of the most widely-disseminated education sites in the world. It is an activity-rich approach to science.

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Interesting BBC article about the future of the drug discovery industry.

“Half a century ago, in the drug industry’s golden era, we were bestowed with countless pills to lower blood pressure, control blood sugar and get rid of infections. But today it costs about $1bn to bring a new medicine to market, a process that can take 15 years.”

“You can hear more on Radio 4: The end of drug discovery?, Tuesday 22 May at 20:00 BST. The programme is repeated on Sunday 27 May at 17:00 BST.”

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Open Culture brings together high-quality cultural & educational media for the worldwide lifelong learning community. Web 2.0 has given great amounts of intelligent audio and video. It’s all free. It’s all enriching. But it’s also scattered across the web, and not easy to find. Open Culture’s whole mission is to centralize this content, curate it, and give you access to this high quality content whenever and wherever you want it. The science section contains videos from NASA’s tour of the Earth from outer space to an animation of how a flu invades your body.

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Photograph of cluttered lab bench with bottles of chemicals, droppers, etc.The UK Clinical Research Network provides an online database of clinical trials in the United Kingdom.  This database includes information about the condition being treated, the intervention being investigated, and the lead investigator.  This database might be useful for drugs development students and those researching clinical interventsions.  It is not aimed at the general public – information about clinical trials for people affected by medical conditions can be found on websites from relevant charities and support groups, e.g., Cancer Research UK’s Trials and Research site.

The US government maintains a similar site covering clinical trials both in the US and worldwide.

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Learn.Genetics delivers educational materials on genetics, bioscience and health topics. They are designed to be used by students, teachers and members of the public. The materials meet selected US education standards for science and health. Learn.Genetics website is one of the most widely-disseminated education sites in the world. It is an activity-rich approach to science.

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The “Chemical Entities of Biological Interest” (ChEBI) database is a free online resource listing naturally occurring small molecules, synthetic small molecules, atoms, ions, ion pairs and radicals that have biological significance. Each database entry has information about the entity’s chemistry and, where known, its biological function.  ChEBI is “designed to help researchers working on the role of proteins as transporters of, or facilitators of reactions between, small molecules”.

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