Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘chemistry’ Category

banana_slug_thumbThe Encyclopedia of Life has an ambitious mission statement to increase awareness and understanding of living nature through a resource that gathers, generates, and shares knowledge in an open, freely accessible and trusted digital resource. They remain committed to bringing you information on all organisms, as they say “Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth – of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria – is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice.”

Read Full Post »

GlasgowGlasgow City of Science is a partnership of over 50 organisations including Glasgow City Council, Glasgow Life, universities, Glasgow School of Art, colleges, research pools and local industry. Their mission, “To inspire the curious, stimulate the creative, empower the wise and connect those with passion”, determines that their site has something for everyone with an interest in any aspect of science. Whether you want to keep up to date with current developments, or sign up for one of their Science Walks, the site has something for you.

Read Full Post »

If you have ever doubted your reasons for taking chemistry, here is a list of 10 reasons as to why chemistry is cool, courtesy of edudemic.com. We’re wondering how many of our students have used reason number 10?

Read Full Post »

_66758600_cellsA collaborative Scottish team, drawn from the universities of Glasgow, Strathclyde and the West of Scotland, are developing a new technique which could help patients with spinal injuries grow new bone. They call it “nanokicking”. It plays on the potential our bodies’ stem cells possess to turn into any other kind of tissue – blood, muscle or, in this case, bone.

Persuading stem cells to become bone has been done in the laboratory before. But existing techniques typically involve complex and expensive engineering or cocktails of chemicals. Instead, this technique mimicks a natural process – when broken bones need to knit, they vibrate.

Read Full Post »

Any chemistry students struggling with their maths? Download this free book from bookboon.com.

“Advanced Maths for Chemists teaches Maths from a “chemical” perspective and is the third of a three part series of texts designed for a first-year university course. It is the Maths required by a Chemist, Chemical Engineer, Chemical Physicist, Molecular Biologist, Biochemist or Biologist. Tutorial questions with fully worked solutions are used and structured on a weekly basis to help the students to self-pace themselves. Coloured molecular structures, graphs and diagrams bring the text alive. Navigation between questions and their solutions is by page numbers for use with your PDF reader.”

Read Full Post »

Brian-Cox-in-Wonders-of-t-007The first in a new much-hyped BBC series presented by Professor Brian Cox, Wonders of Life starts by asking, What is life? Cox uses his natural enthusiasm to communicate the complexities of such a question. This programme achieves that rare balancing act of being both entertaining and educational. The layperson and the science undergraduate will find much to applaud in this series.

Read Full Post »

Scientists have published the most detailed analysis to date of the human genome. They’ve discovered a far larger chunk of our genetic code is biologically active than previously thought. The researchers hope the findings will lead to a deeper understanding of numerous diseases, which could lead to better treatments. The BBC have provided a link to the 30 open-access papers that outline the researchers’ work. Nature magazine also provides a link to the function and findings of ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements).

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: